Hurricane Update 2:30 PM

2:30 p.m. update:If you’re well north and west you might still be waiting on Irene. However, south and east of D.C. rain is beginning to add up. Very little has fallen in parts of northern Loudoun County to .3-.6 (light gray) in a belt from near D.C. to Baltimore and then up to 1” plus over far southeast areas. Yellows and oranges well southeast are in the 2-4” range already. This pattern of rainfall was expected during the day, and more consistently heavier rains will continue to advance north and northwest into the evening.

Even before the brunt, local EMS offices are reporting increased calls with power lines already coming down and water leaking into structures.

Linkedin Stock Rises to over $74 Per Share

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — In its first quarterly update since its sizzling IPO, online professional networking service LinkedIn Corp. reassured investors who have been buying into the hype surrounding a promising crop of Internet companies.

The second-quarter results announced Thursday injected some hope into a grim stock market and could feed the mounting excitement for upcoming initial public offering of stocks from other rising Internet stars such as online coupon Groupon Inc. and Web game maker Zynga Inc.

The reason: LinkedIn reported the accelerating revenue and membership growth that it needed to support its lofty stock price and delivered higher earnings when analysts were bracing for a loss.

It marked the first update since LinkedIn’s headline-grabbing initial public offering of stock in May. The company’s shares immediately doubled from their IPO price of $45 and remained in that range, stirring debate about whether investors are overvaluing Internet companies that build large audiences with mostly free services.

The fervor has raised fears that the Internet may be in the early stages of an investment bubble akin to the late 1990s hysteria that culminated in a devastating collapse.

LinkedIn’s performance served as a reminder that there is at least one significant difference in the latest Internet frenzy: Some of today’s online companies are making money, unlike the ones hatched in the Web’s early days.

LinkedIn earned $4.5 million, or 4 cents per share, in the April-June period. That contrasted with earnings of $938,000, or 2 cents per share, at the same time last year.

Revenue more than doubled from last year to $121 million while membership climbed 61 percent to 116 million at the end of June.

Analysts, on average, had projected a loss of 4 cents per share on revenue of $104.5 million, according to FactSet.

LinkedIn shares rose $3.50, or almost 4 percent, to $99.02 in extended trading to recover part of a steep decline that occurred during the regular trading session amid a sweeping market sell-off.

“The IPO and attention certainly helped raise the company’s profile and compounded the momentum we had already been seeing,” LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner said in a Thursday interview.

The earnings in LinkedIn’s most recent quarter represented the most money the company has made in any three-period so far in its eight-year history. It’s still a puny profit for a company whose market value is sitting around $10 billion.

Losses could loom ahead too. LinkedIn has indicated it’s willing to sacrifice short-term earnings to increase spending on technology and new product development.

Growth is also expected to slow, partly because of economic uncertainty and partly because of the temporary lift provided by the IPO publicity

LinkedIn expects its third-quarter revenue to climb as high as $125 million, which would be slightly below the second-quarter growth rate of 120 percent. For the full year, LinkedIn sees its revenue rising to as high as $485 million, roughly doubling from $243 million in 2010.

The company, which is based in Mountain View, Calif., thinks it is better positioned to weather another recession than most businesses because its network has been designed to help people find better jobs.

“We connect talent with opportunity on a massive scale,” Weiner said in the interview. “When times get tough like this, I think our platform can make a real difference in the lives of people.”

If LinkedIn loses money for a couple quarters, it may not bother investors too much, as long the company is still persuading millions more people to post their resumes and other information about their careers on its website. As its audience grows, LinkedIn’s website will become a more attractive place for advertisers to promote their wares and for employers to recruit talent.

LinkedIn gets more than two-thirds of revenues from fees that it charges companies, corporate recruiting services and other people who want broader access to the profiles and other data on the company’s website. The remainder comes from advertising.

In a conference call with analysts, Weiner said LinkedIn is adding about two members every second. That works out to about 173,000 new members, a pace that would give LinkedIn about 132 registered accounts by the end of September. Weiner told analysts the company had more than 120 million members as of Thursday.

The Bible A Book Celebrating God’s Grace to You Through Jesus Christ

If anyone believes the Holy Bible is open to many different interpretations you are wrong. God’s word literally ‘is what it is”.  You can fool yourself  by thinking you have it all figured out. But guess what? If you have never in your life read every book of the bible to truly understand  the message, then quite frankly you are not qualified to comment on anything.

I will say this the Bible is a book about good vs evil.  There is no in between.  In effect you must choose which side you’re own.  Almighty God, gave his only Son, Jesus Christ, who gave his life for all of us so that we would have safe refuge from our sins, inequities,  and transgressions. All we need to do is accept Jesus Christ  through confession to him of our sins, transgressions, and inequities. Confess that we are sinners and that you want him to come into your life.

When you do this you will have eternal life even when your physical body is no longer here.   Jesus Christ died to overcome this sinful world.  There is sin all around us. Decadence, moral decay, and everything that is an abomination to God.

The best thing you can do is study the bible, know its message and be careful to ask the Lord to send the Holy Spirit to give you the discernment you will need to understand  the powerful verses and stories in the bible.  The more time you give to God, the more understanding he gives to you.

You don’t have to work to be save and receive the gift of eternal life, all you have to do is ask Jesus to come into your life. No matter what you have done, where you been, the shame that has permeated your life, means nothing to Him.  You can become a new person by simply asking Jesus Christ to come into your life and you accept Jesus as  the Lord of your life.  It is His gift of Grace to you.

He made the supreme sacrifice for you on  a hill called  Calvary a long time ago, so that you would have the opportunity to ask Him to come into your life at anytime.  If you have not done so, you can do it right now.  Time is running out.  Don’t die and leave this earth without doing so. The Lord’s tent is big, it does not matter what you have done, the Lord will accept you, anyone, right here, right now.

A good movie to watch to understand God love for you through His Son, Jesus Christ,  is ‘The Passion of the Christ“,buy it or rent it today and then start reading the bible from Genesis to Revelations.  Understanding will come to you through God’s grace.

If you are ready right now to be saved, say this prayer.

“Heavenly Father, have mercy on me, a sinner. I believe in you and that your word is true. I believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of the living God and that he died on the cross so that I may now have forgiveness for my sins and eternal life. I know that without you in my heart my life is meaningless.

I believe in my heart that you, Lord God, raised Him from the dead. Please Jesus forgive me, for every sin I have ever committed or done in my heart, please Lord Jesus forgive me and come into my heart as my personal Lord and Savior today. I need you to be my Father and my friend.

I give you my life and ask you to take full control from this moment on; I pray this in the name of Jesus Christ.”

Amen.

 

 

 

Rick Perry Like All Of Us Has Fallen Short Of Our Interpetation Of The Bible

From Atlantic Magazine-  written by Kathleen Kennedy Townsend

The Texas governor is running an openly religious campaign, but does he overlook the parts of the Bible that do not support his political beliefs?

America is a religious nation. Polls may differ, but most find that over 80 percent of Americans say they believe in God. Fifty percent also say they go to church on Sunday, while only half of those actually do. I guess this shows that we want to look better than we actually are, at least to the public — if not to God, who presumably knows what we’re really up to.

Most political candidates also profess their belief in God. At the same time, they rarely make a big deal of their devotion. They’ve probably read Matthew 6:1, which warns, “Beware of practicing your piety before men in order to be seen by them.”

Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who just announced he’s running for president, has taken a different tack. A week before announcing his candidacy, he led a prayer meeting for evangelical Christians in Houston. The Freedom From Religion Foundation filed a lawsuit trying to stop him from participating in this rally, arguing that he was violating the First Amendment by using his position, stationery, and website to promote the event. The court dismissed the complaint, saying that the plaintiff didn’t show sufficient harm to merit the injunction.

I disagree with the court’s ruling. I think the governor misused his office to promote a particular religion. That might have been clearer to the judge if Perry had organized a rally in support of Islam rather than Christianity. There’s no difference as far as the First Amendment is concerned.

In any case, Gov. Perry’s decision to make his Christian faith a central part of his political identity opens him up to questions not usually asked of presidential candidates.

The press has traditionally been unwilling to question politicians about their religion. But in Perry’s case, Christianity is front and center on his platform. I hope David Gregory will ask him some of the following questions when he next appears on Meet the Press, and that other members of the media won’t shy away from them either.

First, are Rick Perry’s political positions in line with Christ’s teachings?

I see a fundamental inconsistency between Perry’s concerted opposition to government social programs and his promotion of himself as a Christian politician. When asked about the impact of Texas’s low-tax, low-service policies on the poor, he suggested that people who wanted more government services could find them in New York or California.

Christ teaches us to feed the hungry and care for the sick, not to abandon them. Perhaps Gov. Perry hasn’t read that part of the Bible where Christ admonishes us to care for “the least among us.”

It’s more likely that he knows that passage but reads it in a particular light. When I wrote Failing America’s Faithful, I interviewed Rick Warren, the evangelical Christian minister and author, about his bestselling book, The Purpose Driven Life. Rick very kindly welcomed me to Saddleback, the church he had founded more than 30 years before. He and his wife were gracious to me. I was impressed by the thoughtfulness with which he reached out to his congregation, and his sensitivity to their needs and wants.

I had read his book, and coming from a different Christian tradition, I was struck by how much it focused on getting you to feel good about yourself rather than caring about your neighbor, which Christ had said was the greatest commandment.

Warren, who now runs many charitable programs and supports government efforts to help the poor and the sick, was forthright in explaining that his views had changed since writing the book. The evangelical church he had grown up in, he told me, had focused on the believer’s personal relationship to Jesus and pretty much ignored the social side of the gospel. He finally realized that he had “missed the 2,500 passages” in the Bible that called on him to care about other people, including those outside his church.

Does Rick Perry acknowledge those 2,500 passages? That’s the second question I’d like the press to ask him. Maybe he believes, like some socially conservative evangelicals, that these passages refer only to personal charity, not government programs. But I don’t see any place in the Bible that says we shouldn’t use all the tools we have at hand to help the poor, the sick, and the hungry.

The same conservative Christians claim that the Bible teaches them that the government should outlaw gay marriage and stem cell research. But why should the government carry out some Biblical injunctions and not others?

The Bible is certainly open to interpretation. For example, most churches in America today don’t require us to gouge out our eyes if we look lustfully at someone, or to cut off our hand if we use it a sinful way. And yet, right there in Matthew 5:27-30 are clear instructions.

How does Gov. Perry interpret the Bible? Even more to the point, I’d like to hear him explain how he arrived at his interpretations. If you’re running for president in a democratic country, it’s not enough to proclaim that the Bible says something is right or wrong. You must have reasoned positions. Catholics have been taught to inquire into God’s will by using our reason, examining nature, and listening to Church teaching — as well as by interpreting the Bible.

A last question for the governor: does he believe that God agrees with his reading of the Bible? I’m not saying he does believe this; I’m just wondering.

An alternative to assuming our views are aligned with God’s is to humbly acknowledge that God works in mysterious ways, and that our human nature may blind us to His will. In that case, our belief in God could lead us to question the infallibility of our own interpretations rather than making us proud. Pride, at least in the Catholic catechism, is one of the seven deadly sins.

No one has a monopoly on faith. In a democratic nation, simply saying you believe in Christ doesn’t mean you get a free pass and don’t have to explain your positions. The story of the Good Samaritan reminds us that it is our actions, not our public displays of piety, that make us good neighbors.

Perry Lands Himself In Hot Water Less Than One Week of Entering The Race For President

The White House denounced Republican presidential candidate Rick Perry on Tuesday for his threatening remarks toward the head of the U.S. Federal Reserve that represented some of the most inflammatory rhetoric of the 2012 election campaign.

Campaigning in Iowa on Monday, the Texas governor said he would consider it “treasonous” if Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke “prints more money between now and the election” in November 2012 — a fresh sign of the political heat the central bank faces as it tries to right the stumbling U.S. economy.

“If this guy prints more money between now and the election, I don’t know what y’all will do to him in Iowa, but we would treat him pretty ugly down in Texas,” Perry said to laughter from supporters in Iowa.

“Printing more money to play politics at this particular time in American history is almost treacherous, treasonous in my opinion,” he said.

The White House responded by saying it is important for the Fed to remain independent, and jabbed back at Perry, who on Saturday entered the race for the Republican nomination to face Democratic President Barack Obama. Perry is already considered one of the strongest candidates for the Republican nomination.

“I certainly think threatening the Fed chairman is not a good idea,” White House spokesman Jay Carney said.

“When you are president or running for president, you have to think about your words,” Carney said in Iowa, where Obama was on a campaign-style bus tour.

Perry, who succeeded former President George W. Bush as Texas governor, is known for strongly conservative social and fiscal views. In his first three days as a candidate, he has upset Democrats by questioning Obama’s patriotism and implying the U.S. military does not respect Obama as commander-in-chief. His remarks on Bernanke caused the biggest flap.

Another top-tier Republican presidential candidate, U.S. Representative Michele Bachmann, also criticized the Fed. “The Federal Reserve is not subject to transparency. The Federal Reserve has made terrible, grievous errors,” Bachmann told reporters in South Carolina on Tuesday.

U.S. Representative Ron Paul, another Republican presidential candidate, also is a fierce critic of the Fed.

Bernanke was appointed in 2006 by Bush, a Republican, and reappointed by Obama. Under Bernanke, the Fed has embarked on one of the most extended periods of cheap money in U.S. history, keeping U.S. interest rates near zero since late 2008 and pledging to do so until mid-2013.

TARGETING THE FED

Perry, a favorite of the conservative Tea Party movement, may have been trying to tap into the anti-Fed sentiment of some of the most right-leaning Republican voters, who deeply distrust the unelected, but powerful, officials of the central bank.

The Fed has faced fire in Congress over its emergency financial rescues and regulatory lapses. Defenders argue the central bank was right to act aggressively to stem the crisis, and they credit it with preventing a financial collapse.

In fact, some argue that with no appetite among politicians for more fiscal stimulus, Fed action could be the only avenue left for Washington to support the U.S. economic recovery.

While investors chalked up Perry’s comments to the campaign season, they said criticism of the Fed and threats to its political independence could multiply if the economy sours even more and the central bank takes further action to spur growth.

“Make no mistake, inflammatory comments like these are indicative of one thing — an election cycle,” said Keith Wirtz, the chief investment officer at Fifth Third Asset Management, with $18 billion in assets.

Financial markets increasingly expect the Fed to launch a third round of bond buying to provide liquidity if the economy continues to weaken.

“If correct, the noise will explode,” Wirtz said.

The Fed has already conducted two such programs, known as quantitative easing, since the financial crisis. Critics say that such programs are equivalent to the Fed running the printing presses faster and can lead to a long-term reduction in the value of the dollar.

‘NOT THE ANSWER’

Perry’s campaign did not back away from his comments. Campaign spokesman Mark Miner said the Texas governor was expressing frustration with the economic situation and “out of control spending” in Washington.

“Most Americans would agree that printing and spending more money is not the answer to the economic issues facing the country,” Miner said.

But his tone could turn off independent voters whose support will be needed to defeat Obama in the 2012 general election.

“When you say those things in the Lone Star State (Texas), you look colorful. When you say these things on a national stage … it’s going to come back and get you,” said Ford O’Connell, an advisor on Republican John McCain’s 2008 presidential campaign.

“You’ve got to be more like James Bond and less like Rambo,” he said.

Democrats have seized on the latest remarks by Perry, who caused a stir in 2009 when he said Texas might need to secede from the United States, to make their case that he is a loose-talking cowboy likely to act too hastily under pressure if he were to win the White House.

At a campaign event on Monday, Perry was asked if Obama loved the country, and replied, “You need to ask him.”

Asked whether Perry’s remarks were disrespectful, Obama said he would “cut him some slack” as a new candidate.

“Everybody who runs for president, it probably takes them a little bit of time before they start realizing that this isn’t like running for governor or running for senator or running for Congress, and you’ve got to be a little more careful about what you say,” Obama said on CNN’s “The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer.”

Warren Buffett like President Obama Believes Super Rich Should Pay Their Fair Share of Taxes

Stop Coddling the Super-Rich

By WARREN E. BUFFETT
Published: August 14, 2011

From Today’s New York Times

OUR leaders have asked for “shared sacrifice.” But when they did the asking, they spared me. I checked with my mega-rich friends to learn what pain they were expecting. They, too, were left untouched.

While the poor and middle class fight for us in Afghanistan, and while most Americans struggle to make ends meet, we mega-rich continue to get our extraordinary tax breaks. Some of us are investment managers who earn billions from our daily labors but are allowed to classify our income as “carried interest,” thereby getting a bargain 15 percent tax rate. Others own stock index futures for 10 minutes and have 60 percent of their gain taxed at 15 percent, as if they’d been long-term investors.

These and other blessings are showered upon us by legislators in Washington who feel compelled to protect us, much as if we were spotted owls or some other endangered species. It’s nice to have friends in high places.

Last year my federal tax bill — the income tax I paid, as well as payroll taxes paid by me and on my behalf — was $6,938,744. That sounds like a lot of money. But what I paid was only 17.4 percent of my taxable income — and that’s actually a lower percentage than was paid by any of the other 20 people in our office. Their tax burdens ranged from 33 percent to 41 percent and averaged 36 percent.

If you make money with money, as some of my super-rich friends do, your percentage may be a bit lower than mine. But if you earn money from a job, your percentage will surely exceed mine — most likely by a lot.

To understand why, you need to examine the sources of government revenue. Last year about 80 percent of these revenues came from personal income taxes and payroll taxes. The mega-rich pay income taxes at a rate of 15 percent on most of their earnings but pay practically nothing in payroll taxes. It’s a different story for the middle class: typically, they fall into the 15 percent and 25 percent income tax brackets, and then are hit with heavy payroll taxes to boot.

Back in the 1980s and 1990s, tax rates for the rich were far higher, and my percentage rate was in the middle of the pack. According to a theory I sometimes hear, I should have thrown a fit and refused to invest because of the elevated tax rates on capital gains and dividends.

I didn’t refuse, nor did others. I have worked with investors for 60 years and I have yet to see anyone — not even when capital gains rates were 39.9 percent in 1976-77 — shy away from a sensible investment because of the tax rate on the potential gain. People invest to make money, and potential taxes have never scared them off. And to those who argue that higher rates hurt job creation, I would note that a net of nearly 40 million jobs were added between 1980 and 2000. You know what’s happened since then: lower tax rates and far lower job creation.

Since 1992, the I.R.S. has compiled data from the returns of the 400 Americans reporting the largest income. In 1992, the top 400 had aggregate taxable income of $16.9 billion and paid federal taxes of 29.2 percent on that sum. In 2008, the aggregate income of the highest 400 had soared to $90.9 billion — a staggering $227.4 million on average — but the rate paid had fallen to 21.5 percent.

The taxes I refer to here include only federal income tax, but you can be sure that any payroll tax for the 400 was inconsequential compared to income. In fact, 88 of the 400 in 2008 reported no wages at all, though every one of them reported capital gains. Some of my brethren may shun work but they all like to invest. (I can relate to that.)

I know well many of the mega-rich and, by and large, they are very decent people. They love America and appreciate the opportunity this country has given them. Many have joined the Giving Pledge, promising to give most of their wealth to philanthropy. Most wouldn’t mind being told to pay more in taxes as well, particularly when so many of their fellow citizens are truly suffering.

Twelve members of Congress will soon take on the crucial job of rearranging our country’s finances. They’ve been instructed to devise a plan that reduces the 10-year deficit by at least $1.5 trillion. It’s vital, however, that they achieve far more than that. Americans are rapidly losing faith in the ability of Congress to deal with our country’s fiscal problems. Only action that is immediate, real and very substantial will prevent that doubt from morphing into hopelessness. That feeling can create its own reality.

Job one for the 12 is to pare down some future promises that even a rich America can’t fulfill. Big money must be saved here. The 12 should then turn to the issue of revenues. I would leave rates for 99.7 percent of taxpayers unchanged and continue the current 2-percentage-point reduction in the employee contribution to the payroll tax. This cut helps the poor and the middle class, who need every break they can get.

But for those making more than $1 million — there were 236,883 such households in 2009 — I would raise rates immediately on taxable income in excess of $1 million, including, of course, dividends and capital gains. And for those who make $10 million or more — there were 8,274 in 2009 — I would suggest an additional increase in rate.

My friends and I have been coddled long enough by a billionaire-friendly Congress. It’s time for our government to get serious about shared sacrifice.

Warren E. Buffett is the chairman and chief executive of Berkshire Hathaway.

Michelle Bachmann Wins Iowa Straw Poll

AMES, Iowa — Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann won a test vote of Iowans on Saturday, a show of popularity and organizational strength for the tea party favorite five months before the state’s caucuses kick off the GOP presidential nominating season.

The result is the first indication of what Iowans think of the field of Republicans competing for the chance to challenge President Barack Obama next fall. But it’s hardly predictive of who will win the winter Iowa contest, much less the party nod or the White House.

Rather, Saturday’s outcome suggests that Bachmann has a certain level of support and, perhaps even more important, the strongest get-out-the-vote operation and widest volunteer base in a state whose caucuses require those elements.

Texas Rep. Ron Paul finished a close second while former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty placed a distant third.

“We have a lot more work to do,” Pawlenty said, making clear he wasn’t dropping out despite a disappointing finish. “We are just beginning and I’m looking forward to a great campaign.”

The results of the nonbinding vote, held on the Iowa State University campus, came just hours after Texas Gov. Rick Perry entered the race.

“I full well believe I’m going to win,” Perry told South Carolina voters on a conference call before delivering his first speech as a candidate.

“It’s time to get America working again,” he declared in Charleston, S.C. “America is not broken. Washington, D.C., is broken.”

Despite Perry’s best efforts to overshadow the day, the epicenter of the presidential contest was in this Midwestern town, where nearly 17,000 Iowans cast ballots during a daylong political festival, a late-summer ritual held every four years.

In speeches throughout the day, candidates scouted for support by assailing Obama and offering themselves as the answer to an America plagued by high unemployment, rising debt and stock market swings.

“We know what America needs. But unfortunately Barack Obama has no clue. He’s like a manure spreader in a windstorm,” Pawlenty said, adding: “Mr. President, get the government off our backs.” That elicited chants of his nickname: “T-Paw! T-Paw! T-Paw!”

Pawlenty had a lot on the line. He’s ranked low in polls and was looking to prove he was still a viable candidate. He argued that he was the candidate of results, given his record as Minnesota governor.

Bachmann stressed faith and her Iowa roots — she was born in Waterloo — as well as her opposition to abortion rights and gay marriage. She earned cheers when she declared: “We are going to make Barack Obama a one-term president.”

Bachmann, riding high since entering the race earlier this summer, had hoped that a strong finish would give her even more momentum just as Perry looks to infringe on her base of tea party and evangelical support. She invoked God and faith as she stressed what she called her conservative values, saying: “In Iowa, we are social conservatives and we will never be ashamed of being social conservatives.”

Paul, with a following among libertarian-leaning voters, wanted a surprise showing that might convince Republicans he was more mainstream than not in his second shot at the GOP nomination. He referenced his fellow Texan’s entrance in the race and said he didn’t anticipate many of his supporters jumping ship for what he called a “super-establishment candidate.”

Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, businessman Herman Cain and former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich of Georgia also were on the ballot. So were GOP front-runner Mitt Romney and former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, though they weren’t competing in the contest.

Perry and former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, who made a splash Friday when she visited the state fair, weren’t listed. But their backers planned write-in campaigns that could outpace candidates who have spent months trying to line up supporters to participate.

The straw poll isn’t a scientific poll at all; it amounts to a popularity contest and a test of organizational strength.

Poor showings usually force some candidates, mostly those who are not well-known and are struggling to raise money, to abandon their bids. That could happen this year, too.

The straw poll has a mixed record of predicting the outcome of the precinct caucuses.

In 2008, Romney won the straw poll, but the big news was the surprising second-place showing of former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee. Huckabee won the Iowa caucuses, but dropped from the race soon after. Sen. John McCain, who eventually won the nomination, didn’t compete in the straw poll and finished in 10th place.

Tim Tebow Has A Decent Game Against Dallas

Denver Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow has been under the microscope so much lately it’s a wonder he’s not encased in glass.

So it is then, that the view of his preseason performance in Thursday’s 24-23 loss to Dallas at Cowboys Stadium depends through what lens that effort is viewed.

Entering the game one series after starting quarterback Kyle Orton departed with a field-goal drive in his pocket, Tebow was 6-of-7 passing for 91 yards in four first-half possessions. More than half his passing yards came on a 46-yard strike over the middle to receiver Matt Willis. He was at the helm for six Broncos points against the Cowboys’ second-team defense.

“He put points on the board, that’s the key,” Broncos coach John Fox said. “And we didn’t dump the ball to the other team, so I think for a young quarterback he did very well.”

Tebow had a 118.8 rating while working nearly as much from the shotgun (eight snaps) as under center (13). Tebow, starting his second NFL season, also saw a seven-yard TD scramble over the left side wiped out by a holding penalty, an interception nullified by a pass interference call and a 10-yard loss on a sack in which he had no escape.

Tebow also had some of the hiccups that drive his critics batty. He seemed to take off a tick too quickly on a few occasions. His accuracy—another emphasis—wasn’t pinpoint, despite the high completion rate.

The Willis catch might have been a long score had it hit the wideout in stride. Another red-zone pass was behind Willis instead of leading him on third down, sending out the field-goal unit.

Still, after no organized offseason and barely two weeks of practice under intense media heat, Tebow’s work was a stepping-stone.

“I felt more confident in my reads and decisions,” Tebow said. “There’s a few I’d probably change but for the most part I felt like I did the right thing the rest of the plays. Definitely room for improvement.”

Brady Quinn continued to keep the heat on Tebow for the No. 2 job with a strong second half, in which he was 8-of-14 passing for 120 yards, a TD and 109.2 rating.

Half of Quinn’s four series culminated in TDs, including an eight-yard bullet pass to Eron Riley in the back of the end zone with 5:44 left,

“I think we all felt good on offense,” Quinn said. “We’ve definitely come along.”

Tim Tebow’s Faith Is Questioned by CBS Reporter

From the Christian Post

Before his second professional season has even begun, naysayers are questioning his confidence that relies on his Christian beliefs.

CBSSports.com national columnist Gregg Doyel recently analyzed Tebow’s interview with Denver Post and said the way he equated his love for God in heaven with tangible rewards on earth amounted to blasphemy. The interview was prompted by reports that Tebow might not begin the season as Denver’s starting quarterback.

Doyel’s analysis angered Tebow’s fans. “Dude, your article bothers me. You know dang well that you painted Tebow as a religious nut-job,” complained one Daniel Liebman. Doyel Friday responded to what he described as “hate mails” from “Tebow fanatics.”

“I didn’t paint him as a religious nut-job. Tebow’s the one holding the brush. I just hung his art on the wall and asked you folks to take a look,” the columnist said.

“Your article on Christian faith is extremely offensive,” wrote another fan, Chance Jones. “I have forwarded my thoughts to many individuals at CBS Sports and will no longer be a customer.” Doyel listed the responses sent by Tebow’s fans followed by a statement defending his analysis.

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While Tebow is not known to have responded to criticism, he posted “Joshua 1:19” on his Facebook page Friday. The verse, which reads, “Have I not commanded you? Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged, for the LORD your God will be with you wherever you go,” alluded to the charge.

Debi Albritton, a fan commented, saying, “Your faith and your continued show of faith even against all the naysayers is a testament to all Christians. May God bless you and continue to strengthen you against all the adversity you receive!”

Doyel’s article juxtaposed views that suggest “Tebow will never be a good NFL quarterback,” with his confidence in God for his success. “He doesn’t believe it. Which is fine… But check out the reason why he doesn’t believe it,” the sports columnist continued.

Then Doyel quoted Tebow as saying, “Others who say I won’t make it are wrong. They don’t know what I’m capable of and what’s inside me. My family and my friends have been bothered by what’s gone on, and I tell them to pay no attention to it. I’m relying as always on my faith.”

“He’ll make it in this league – for the Bible tells him so,” Doyel remarked. “From the outside it looks like Tebow equates his love for God in heaven with tangible rewards here on earth. And that’s more than wrong. It’s blasphemy.” However, Doyel claimed he had nothing against Tebow or his God and that he considered him the nicest person he had ever met.

Collin Hansen, editorial director of The Gospel Coalition, in a blog Friday, commented on the controversy involving Doyel and Tebow.

“I’m not sure if Doyel knows what blasphemy is, or the seriousness of the charge he’s leveling against Tebow,” Hansen commented. “Tebow could be saying he relies on his faith to withstand criticism and pressure, not that he finds assurance in his future as a starting quarterback because God loves him.”

However, Doyel agrees Tebow’s life has been “grandiose.”

“He was the best high school player in America. The best college player in America, and one of the most accomplished players – one Heisman, two national titles – in history. A first-round draft pick of the Denver Broncos in 2010.”

At college in Florida, Tebow frequently wore biblical verses on his eye black. In the 2009 Bowl Championship Series, he wore “John 3:16” on his eye paint, reportedly causing 92 million people to search the verse on Google. Later, Tebow switched to “Proverbs 3:5-6,” again causing 3.43 million searches of the verse together with “Tim Tebow.

Washington Politicans Continue To Use Racially Disparaging Code Words Agaianst President Obama

In this climate of change in demographics, and more people are inclusive of individuals different from them, why is it that so many politicians feel that they have creative license to use  racial slurs or racial innuendos, when they are complaining about President Obama’s political agenda.

Instead of attacking the agenda, they are attacking Obama, personally with racially charged  code words.  They say everything except actually use the “N” word.  If they could get away with it, they would use the “N” word.  They usually follow-up the slurs with a half  heart apology.

Why is it that Mitch McConnell can brag that his mission is to destroy Barack Obama to ensure that he does not have another term?  He’s calling himself-  “just a committed Republican”.  How about a committed racist?  Yes, it is alright to oppose  the President on an ideological basis, thats politics, but to literally oppose any and every legislation that he puts forth and to state that you hope everything he does fails, is not in the spirit of what this country is about.  He is not only disparaging President Obama, he is also harming our country and the American people in general.

McConnell is a great example of a Republican from Kentucky, who has way to much power, especially to speak for  all Americans. Yet McConnell and his Republican friends, who by the way, all look like him, mistakenly believe that this  is what America wants.  And to top it off the guy is 69 years old. Can you say out of touch? No way him or his friends will like President Barack Obama, a black president from Hawaii!

No way we can expect that McConnell  will warm up to Obama, he probably never knew  a black man, except maybe his gardener or someone who worked in his cotton field in Kentucky.  Here are some words of encouragement we can give the president in dealing with  this guy – “Good luck with That!”